36 Types of Beetles With Stripes

Types of Beetles With Stripes
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Certain beetle species have stripes, just like the tiger, which is the closest relative to the family tree.

Unfortunately, there are so many beetles with stripes that it’s hard to find, so here are 36 types of beetles with stripes you can admire in your backyard or home, but please don’t capture or relocate them!

They’re nature’s pest control and help keep your local ecology healthy!

1. Ten-Lined June Beetle

The ten-lined June Beetle (also known as the long-necked June bug) is a member of the scarab beetle family.

It is one of the most common types of beetles with stripes in North America, and it can be found throughout Canada and the United States. 

In addition to being striped, this type of beetle has a long neck and no wings. This type of beetle will typically live for 2-5 years.

These types of beetles with stripes feed on plants in the carrot family, making them helpful for farmers because they help control pests such as aphids that would eat crops.

2. Colorado Potato Beetle

One type of beetle with stripes is the Colorado Potato Beetle. A member of the family Chrysomelidae, the Colorado Potato Beetle, is a voracious pest that feeds on potatoes and other nightshades, including eggplants and peppers. The adult beetles are about 1⁄2 inch long and oval. 

These types of beetles with stripes can be brown or black and often have yellow stripes across their elytra (wing cases).

Larvae are usually dark-colored, spiky insects that can grow up to 11⁄2 inches in length. The eggs are often laid at the end of ridges on a leaf or stem, where they stay until they hatch into larvae.

3. False Potato Beetle

The false potato beetle (Leptinotarsa juncta) is a brown, flat-bodied insect ranging from 5.5 to 7.5 mm.

These types of beetles with stripes are often found in the Southern and Western parts of the United States, where they feed on plants in the nightshade family, including potatoes, eggplants, tomatoes, and pepper plants. 

The false potato beetle lays eggs at the base of plants and then feeds on leaves as it grows larger. A few telltale signs that you have these beetles include yellowing leaves and holes in plant leaves from their feeding habits.

To get rid of them, you will need to use an insecticide or neem oil that keeps them away for a little while but won’t kill them immediately.

4. Striped Cucumber Beetle

Cucumber beetles, also known as striped cucumber beetles, are a type of beetle that feeds on cucumbers and other plants in the family of Cucurbitaceae.

These types of beetles with stripes have gray or brown bodies with two yellow stripes running across their back.

These types of beetles with stripes get their name from their penchant for feeding on cucumbers, which has earned them the nickname cucumber beetle. 

There are many different types of cucumber beetles because they come in varying sizes, ranging from 3 to 6 millimeters long.

One type is the spotted cucumber beetle, found throughout most parts of North America and about 4-6 millimeters long.

5. Three-Lined Potato Beetle

The three-lined potato beetle has a black and yellow banded body covered in long, thick hairs. These types of beetles with stripes are typically about 3/4-inch long.

The larvae are yellow or brown and can be seen feeding on the undersides of the leaves. This beetle primarily feeds on members of the nightshade family, including potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers.

Striped cucumber beetles have a black head and thorax section, while their abdomen is striped yellow and black.

These types of beetles with stripes are around 5/8 inch long; they feed on plants from the cucurbit family, such as squash, melons, and pumpkins.

In addition, the striped cucumber beetle is known to eat beans, soybeans, and corn.

6. Pigweed Flea Beetle

The Pigweed Flea Beetle is a pest in many areas. It feeds on pigweed, and the larvae feed on the roots and destroy fields. The adult beetles fly to nearby fields and lay eggs, reproducing and feeding on plant roots. 

However, these types of beetles with stripes prefer to feed close to the ground, making them difficult to spot. When they mature, the female beetles will lay over 2000 eggs in a lifetime.

7. Cottonwood Leaf Beetle

The Cottonwood Leaf Beetle is a beetle with stripes commonly found in the United States. The three lines on their back can identify the larvae.

As an adult, it’s typically between 3/4 to 1 inch long and ranges from yellow-golden to greenish brown. 

These types of beetles with stripes feed on willows, cottonwoods, poplar trees, and sometimes oak trees. Females lay eggs on the leaves of their host plants, and they hatch within a week or two.

The adult beetles live for about six months, during which time they lay eggs multiple times.

8. Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes root weevil is a type of beetle that has stripes. It’s a pest in South America, and it can cause damage to crops like sugarcane, orange trees, and limes.

These types of beetles with stripes are attracted to crops from the larvae stage because they produce chemicals that mimic the plant’s natural defense mechanisms. 

The adults lay eggs in the soil next to the plant, and when those eggs hatch, larvae will burrow into the roots and feed on them for about two years before emerging as an adult.

There are many types of beetles with stripes, but Diaprepes root weevil is one of the most common pests that is often found on farms in South America.

9. Analeptura Lineola

Analeptura Lineola is a beetle with stripes running down the length of its body. These types of beetles with stripes are native to Asia but were introduced to Europe in the early 1900s. 

They’re relatively small at just over half an inch long and have a brown or black coloration with white stripes down their back.

These types of beetles with stripes feed on other insects and can be found in fields and meadows, especially during summertime.

10. Strangalepta Flower Longhorn Beetle

Strangalepta Flower Longhorn Beetle is a type of beetle with stripes. These types of beetles with stripes are found in eastern, south-eastern, and southern Africa.

They live in forests and woodlands and feed on tree sap. They have a dark red or black body that has yellow stripes. 

The brown wings are long and narrow, making them fast flyers. When threatened, they sometimes emit a foul-smelling liquid from their anus as a defense mechanism.

11. Striped Blister Beetle

The striped blister beetle is a type of spotted beetle that is typically found on flowers. This type of beetle has black and yellow markings on its body. It feeds on nectar, pollen, and honeydew secretions from aphids, plant sap, and tree bark.

These types of beetles with stripes lay eggs in the soil, which hatch into white grubs. The grubs will spend up to three years as larvae before pupating into adult beetles.

12. Goldenrod Leaf Miner Beetle

Goldenrod Leaf Miner Beetle (Chrysomela aureola) is a beetle with stripes that feed on goldenrod plants.

These types of beetles with stripes can be found throughout North America in areas where the plants grow and thrive.

Adult beetles are between 12-14mm in length, while larvae are up to 8mm in length. Larvae overwinter in the soil and emerge in the spring as adults to feed on goldenrod plants. 

Goldenrod Leaf Miner Beetles may also be confused for an ant because they are often seen feeding on ants.

However, they get their name from eating leaf tissue, causing minor damage and leaving behind telltale yellowish-brown to white frass, insect excrement, and plant fragments.

13. Alligatorweed Flea Beetle

The Alligatorweed Flea Beetle is a type of beetle that is found in south Florida.

However, it has been seen as far north as Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The beetle was named for its markings resembling an alligator’s skin. 

The larvae are also greenish-brown and have six black spots on their back. These types of beetles with stripes feed on the roots and leaves of alligator weed plants, hence their name!

14. Locust Leaf-Miner Beetle

Locust Leaf-Miner Beetle is a species in the leaf-mining beetle family. It is found worldwide, from the tropics to temperate regions, and can be found on various plants. The larvae are leaf miners, but adults feed on leaves as well. 

Locust Leaf-Miner Beetle larvae tunnel through leaf tissue leaving behind winding trails. Like other types of beetles with stripes, this beetle has flightless wings that are not used for flying.

15. Disonycha Leptolineata

This beetle’s common name is the Seven-spotted Lady Beetle. It is a type of ladybug and a member of the family, Coccinellidae. Their colors vary but are typically orange or red with black spots on their wing covers. 

The seven spots on its back are where they get its name from, and the number of black stripes that run down its back.

These types of beetles with stripes can be found in various habitats, such as grasslands and open fields, woodland areas, and dry forests. 

The Seven-spotted Lady Beetle feeds mainly on aphids or small insects that feed on plants and other vegetation.

These types of beetles with stripes eat adult aphids and young ones who have not yet developed wings, so they cannot fly away from predators such as this beetle.

16. Ragweed Leaf Beetle

The ragweed leaf beetle (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is a beetle with stripes belonging to the Chrysomelidae family.

These types of beetles with stripes are mainly found in North America and typically on plants such as ragweed, sunflower, and plantain. 

These beetles have a brown head and thorax, yellow elytra, and bright red legs. The coloration of these insects will help them camouflage when sitting on the leaves of their host plants.

17. Glorious Jewel Scarab

Glorious jewel scarabs are medium-sized beetles that have an alternating pattern of black and yellow stripes.

The males have a black head, while the females have a brown head. Females are larger than males and have an extended ovipositor on the end of the abdomen used to lay eggs in moist soil. 

These types of beetles with stripes can be found in various habitats, but they prefer open spaces where they can avoid being disturbed by humans and other animals that might want to eat them. Jewel scarabs are one type of beetle with stripes.

18. Goldenrod Leaf Beetle

The goldenrod leaf beetle is a type of beetle with stripes. These types of beetles with stripes are a common pest to farmers, as they prefer the sap from the leaves and flowers over other plants.

This type of beetle has two yellow stripes that run across its back, one just below the head and one down the center of its wing covers. 

The goldenrod leaf beetle gets its name from their preference for feeding on goldenrod flowers, although it will feed on other plants if there is not enough to eat.

This type of beetle is also known for being an important food source for birds in autumn when few other insects are around to eat.

19. Coreopsis Beetle

Coreopsis beetles are a type of beetle that lives in the southern United States. These types of beetles with stripes can be found in flowers, sap, and manure. 

The name coreopsis is derived from the Greek word koris, which means bed bug, and opsis, which resembles bed bugs. Coreopsis beetles have stripes that run down their backs.

20. Double-Banded Bid

Double-Banded Bycid beetles are a type of beetle that has two stripes on their backs.

These types of beetles with stripes have distinctive colors and patterns, varying depending on the subspecies. They also have double bands on their abdomens, hence the name Double-Banded Bid. 

Double-Banded Bycid beetles are usually black or brown with white stripes running from their head to their middle abdominal area.

The stripes can also be orange or red; sometimes, the stripe pattern is only one instead of two bands. The colors will depend on the subspecies of the observed Double-Banded Bycid beetle.

21. Long-Haired June Beetle

The Long-Haired June Beetle is a type of beetle with stripes known to be found in the eastern United States. These types of beetles with stripes are often mistaken for another type of beetle, the Japanese beetle.

However, these beetles have also been spotted in Ohio and North Carolina

One way you can tell this type of beetle from others is by the long hairs on their bodies and antennae. In addition, they have a black head, and their antennae are longer than the body’s width. 

The Long-Haired June Beetle gets its name from being most active during June. These types of beetles with stripes feed on various plants, including fruit trees, grape vines, currants, blackberries, roses, and other types.

22. Lined Stenolophus

There are 36 types of beetles with stripes. The Lined Stenolophus is one type that has a dark band on each elytron.

It is found in North America and can live on the ground or under rocks and logs in forests, prairies, deserts, gardens, and old buildings.

These types of beetles with stripes feed on lettuce, cabbage, tomatoes, potatoes, and beans. In addition, these types of beetles with stripes will also eat insects like ants or flies.

The adults grow to about 3 cm long (1.2 inches). Adults will lay eggs inside crevices in the soil near where they feed. 

Larvae hatch from these eggs after about 10 days and go through four stages before turning into pupae for another 2 weeks before becoming an adult beetle for 4-6 months.

23. Striped June Beetle

The striped June beetle is common among the types of beetles with stripes. They are found throughout the United States and Canada and are typically no more than 1 inch long.

The main identifying feature for these beetles is the two rows of alternating light and dark stripes that run down their backs. 

These types of beetles with stripes have wings but cannot fly, so they crawl instead. This means they can often be found in homes crawling on walls or ceilings.

The larvae stage can also be found in homes, as it looks like a grubworm, and it is this larvae stage that causes damage to wood or paper products like books or wallpaper by eating them.

24. Pennsylvania Flea Beetle

The Pennsylvania flea beetle is a type of beetle that is usually brown and has stripes. It can be found in fields, on weeds, and in gardens. The adult beetle is about 1/8-inch long. 

Adult beetles feed on plants by chewing holes into the leaves. This damages the plant and reduces its ability to produce food for humans and animals. Larvae are white grubs that grow up to 1/2-inch long. 

These types of beetles with stripes live in the soil, where they eat decaying vegetation. These types of beetles with stripes pupate underground in the fall, emerging as adults at ground level after overwintering.  

Garden Flea Beetle: The garden flea beetle is a type of insect that belongs to the Chrysomelidae family and feeds on many types of vegetation like broccoli, cabbage, kale, mustard greens, peas, potatoes, and tomatoes. Adults have wings but rarely fly away from plants they’ve been feeding on.

25. Western Striped Cucumber Beetle

The Western Striped Cucumber Beetle, also known as the striped cucumber beetle, is a green or yellow beetle with black and white stripes.

There are two Western Striped Cucumber Beetle types: a lemon-yellow type and a bronze-green type. The eggs are laid in clusters on the undersides of plant leaves. 

The larvae or grubs feed on roots and stems. These types of beetles with stripes may also chew holes in fruits like melons, pumpkins, squash, tomatoes, and peppers. The life cycle of this type of beetle takes about 3 to 4 weeks to complete. 

The Western Striped Cucumber Beetle can be controlled using chemical insecticides and maintaining gardens orderly, providing fewer infestation opportunities. There are 36 types of beetles with stripes, including the Western Striped Cucumber Beetle!

26. White-Striped Tiger Beetle

The White-Striped Tiger Beetle gets its name from the white stripes on its back. It is found in North America in fields, meadows, and yards. These types of beetles with stripes fly and use their front legs to capture prey during the day. 

These types of beetles with stripes can be seen feeding on other insects and plants. However, the most common predators are birds, spiders, and lizards. 

The White-Striped Tiger Beetle is mostly brown, with three white stripes running across its back and two black lines down each side of its body that become thinner towards the front wings.

In addition, 11 spots on each side of its wing covers called elytra to help protect the beetle’s delicate wings during flight.

27. Rabbitbrush Beetle

The Rabbitbrush Beetle is a beetle with stripes running from the head to the middle back.

These types of beetles with stripes live in central and western North America. They are typically found in arid or semi-arid regions, where they feed on leaves, flowers, and fruit. 

The name comes from the resemblance to a rabbit’s ears and tail. The color ranges vary across individuals. Females are often smaller than males.

Breeding season varies by location. In some places, it happens year-round, while in others, there may be periods when beetles do not breed because their habitats have dried up.

28. Round-Headed Apple Tree Borer

The round-headed apple tree borer is a type of beetle with stripes. These types of beetles with stripes and round-headed apple tree borers were first identified in 1843 and found in parts of the United States, Europe, Asia, and Africa.

This beetle lays eggs on fruit trees under bark and feeds on the fruit’s juices as it grows. 

The larvae will eventually emerge from the egg tunnel after about two weeks or when fully grown. Adults fly away to lay their eggs on other fruit trees when they emerge. 

Larvae that hatch from these eggs will bore through the bark to reach the living tissue inside the trunk or limb before winter arrives. These tunnels often cause wounds that lead to rot and death for infested trees and branches.

29. Lewis’ Soldier Beetle

This beetle has a black head, thorax, and elytra, and the abdomen is striped with black. Lewis’ soldier beetles are found in Europe, Asia, and Africa.

When threatened or touched, they secrete an oily substance from their joints that can cause blisters on human skin. 

These types of beetles with stripes eat pollen as larvae but primarily feed on decaying organic matter as adults.

This beetle with stripes overwinters as pupae under bark or inside rotten logs. They also emit pheromones to communicate with other types of beetles with stripes.

30. Ragweed Leaf Beetle

The ragweed leaf beetle is a type of beetle with stripes. It has brown, oval-shaped wings.

The larvae are white and round, and the adult beetles are about one inch long. This type of beetle is known for feeding on ragweed plants. 

When these types of beetles with stripes have finished eating, the adult beetles leave behind yellow stains on the leaves, which turn into black spots over time. The life cycle of this type of beetle usually takes about three to four months.

31. Western Corn Rootworm Beetle

The Western Corn Rootworm Beetle is found throughout the United States and Canada.

It is one of the most damaging pests to corn because it can eat the roots, which kills the plant. The beetles are between two and three centimeters long and have dark brown or black bodies. 

One distinguishing feature from other beetles with stripes on their bodies is the yellowish-white spots on their wing covers. These types of beetles with stripes also have an orange, flat area at the end of their abdomen.

32. Red-Margined Blister Beetle

The red-margined blister beetle is one of 36 types of beetles with stripes. Their scientific name is Meloidae, which means honey-producing in Greek.

These types of beetles with stripes are grouped under the subfamily Meloinae and are known for their bright colors and blistering protection.

The red-margined blister beetle can be found in North America from Canada to Mexico, as well as parts of Central America and the West Indies.

They prefer sandy soils that are not wet or too dry, like coastal dunes or areas where floodwater has receded.

These types of beetles with stripes feed on plants and other insects but eat rotting fruit that has fallen off trees, such as apples or peaches.

33. Two-Lined Chestnut Borer

The two-lined chestnut borer is a type of beetle with stripes that can be found in North America.

It is usually found in the southern United States but has been spotted as far north as Michigan. The beetles are brown and black striped, measuring 1/2 inch long by 3/8 inches wide. 

These types of beetles with stripes burrow into dead or dying trees and produce large amounts of frass (sawdust), which often resembles sawdust.

The larvae feed on the wood, creating extensive galleries and tunnels throughout the tree, often killing it.

34. Dogwood Twig Borer

The dogwood twig borer is among the types of beetle with stripes. It is also known as the white pine weevil and attacks deciduous trees, including oak, maple, and birch.

The larvae feed on the woody tissue just below the bark, which can result in branch dieback or death to the tree. 

The dogwood twig borer is found in North America, mostly around Eastern Canada and New England. In this area, it causes only minor damage to trees because plenty of species can resist its attack. 

However, when these types of beetles with stripes attack other areas with few resistant species present, such as Western Canada or Northern Europe, more major infestations can occur and cause more extensive damage to trees.

35. Yerba Santa Beetle

The Yerba Santa beetle is among the types of beetle with stripes. It is black, white, and brown and can be found in the western United States. The Yerba Santa beetle’s wingspan ranges from 1 to 1 1⁄2 inches. 

These types of beetles with stripes are nocturnal, meaning they sleep during the day and are awake at night. They eat various plants, such as eucalyptus trees, sagebrush, and pines.

When threatened, these beetles will fly for short periods and run away from predators on foot if necessary.

36. Lined Buprestid Beetle

The Lined Buprestid Beetle is among the types of beetle with stripes. It is usually reddish-brown, but the larvae are yellow. The larvae feed on leaves and other plants, while the adults feed on sap from trees. 

The females can lay up to 60 eggs which are white and can be found in grass or leaf litter, often near trees.

These types of beetle with stripes will produce about two generations per year. Types of beetles with stripes include over 4000 species that range in size from less than 1mm to more than 80mm (3/4 inch). 

Some types of beetle with stripes have patterns that include spots, bands, and lines running down their bodies.

For example, one beetle with stripes is called the Tiger Beetle because it has distinctive black bands on its body resembling tiger stripes. These types of beetles with stripes also eat insects like ants and cockroaches.

Conclusion

Insects come in all shapes and sizes, but some may be hard to identify. Learn how to tell the difference between types of beetles with stripes, like ladybugs and water boatmen! 

These animals are both types of beetles with stripes and are two examples of arthropods that use their claws to cling to objects or prey.

A lot can be learned by examining the markings on these creatures’ exoskeletons, so give it a try!

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